Submitted by Steve on 09:47, 13th Jul, 2016 | 0

One of the main causes of irritation to everyone – including many dog owners – is fouling in public places. Everyone has to share the same recreational space and there is nothing worse than having to constantly look for dog poo to prevent you or your children stepping or even falling into it.

Obviously it is the dog that does the poo but it is unfair to blame the canine population; it is the responsibility of the dog owner to ensure that the dog's mess is cleaned up. Although there are a great number of owners that do clear it up, there are still some people who feel it is unhygienic or not something they should have to do, however it is a real health hazard to leave it where it lies - on pavements, in parks and playgrounds, or even on the beach and it is also against the law.

In recent weeks dog fouling has been highlighted in Guernsey with a growing number of individuals using chalk on pathes with messages like 'Pick it up!' to the flags seen in the Forest area with similar messages highlighting dog faeces being left.

We have heard today that the States Vet has been looking at DNA testing of dog poo which is something that has been seen as a growing trend in certain areas to try and tackle fouling issues by dogs.

The GSPCA would like to know your thoughts on dog faeces issues in Guernsey and here is a link to a survey we have launched to day and also you can take part by scrolling below - https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RLFD3CX

Some Man's Best Friend's Facts -

  • There are estimated 8.5 million dogs in the UK (source PFMA), 63 million dogs in the EU (source EU Dog and Cat Alliance) and approximately 8-10,000 dogs in Guernsey
  • 24% of UK households live with a dog(source PFMA).
  • An average 18kg dog produces 317g of dog poo a day
  • If we take an estimate of 8.5 million dogs in the UK and that an average dog produces 317g a day that equates to 2,694,500kg a day
  • If we take an estimate of 8000 dogs in Guernsey and that an average dog produces 317g a day that equates to 2,536kg produced locally a day

The Law

The Control of Dogs Ordinance (1992) applies to all public places and states that an offence is committed if a person in charge of a dog fails to clean up his faeces. It is no defence to claim ignorance of the dog’s actions, the law, or not to have a device available to remove the faeces. This could result in a prosecution and fine.

Health Risks

All faeces contains bacteria that can cause stomach upsets if ingested. However, the greatest risk to public health from dog faeces is toxocariasis.

Toxocariasis

Toxocariasis is an infection of the round worm, spread via unwashed vegetables and dog faeces. Young children in particular are at risk due to their weaker immune systems and because they are more likely to expose themselves by ingesting the eggs. A puppy can pass as many as 15,000 eggs per gram of faeces, and they are a major source of environmental contamination.

Each T. canis female can lay up to 700 eggs a day. These are passed out when the dog defecates and can survive for up to three years in soil. After two to three weeks of warm weather the eggs develop into an embryo state, containing larva - this is when they become infective to dogs and people. The larvae try to migrate through the human body as they would in a dog's, but the human body treats them as foreign material, which causes a reaction and tissue damage.

There are two types of toxocariasis: visceral larva migrans (VLM) and ocular larva migrans (OLM).

In VLM, the larvae reach the liver, causing inflammation and symptoms such as abdominal pain and pyrexia. Most people recover spontaneously.

OLM occurs when a migrating larva reaches the eye. It causes a granuloma to form on the retina, causing significant visual impairment and in severe cases even blindness.

There are about 12 new cases of OLM diagnosed annually in the UK.

Reduce the Risk

  • Pick up after your dog every time your dog makes a mess. Keep a packet of bags next to the dog's lead as a reminder to take them with you.
  • Ensure you regularly worm your dog - every three to six months. Use a prescription wormer from a veterinary surgeon.
  • Do not take dogs into parks that have children's playgrounds. The Control of Dogs Ordinance (1992) specifies that dogs are prohibited from children’s play areas such as those at Sausmarez Park as well as other specified public grounds such as La Vallette Bathing Pools.
  • Do not let your dog off lead if they are likely to run out of sight. If you can’t see them how can you know if or where they have had a poo!

Bag It and Bin It

A poo bag is very similar to a nappy sack. It is a small plastic bag with two handles at the top. A knot can be tied in the handles to seal them closed.  The filled bag should either be carried home for safe disposal via the refuse bin or dog loo, or placed in one of the dedicated 'poo bins', provided across the Island.

Alternatively use a 'poop scoop' which is a very simple plastic claw device that is used in conjunction with 'poop bags'.

Pregnant women and individuals with impaired immunity should take extra precautions when cleaning up the faeces by wearing disposable gloves available from chemists.

Steve Byrne GSPCA Manager said "We often speak to dog owners about the issues with dog faeces being left and not picked up in Guernsey."

"Dog faeces can pose real health issues as well as being unsightly and all of us at the GSPCA would urge all dog owners to ensure they pick up after their pets."

"We sell poo bags at the GSPCA and at just 2 pence a bag it really is something that all canine owners have a responsibility to do."

"We have launched an a survey to get your thoughts on dog fouling issues in Guernsey which only takes a few moments, so please do let us know your feelings on this subject."

Create your own user feedback survey

To donate via giving.gg to help Olivia the loggerhead turtle home please click here

giving.gg GSPCA Guernsey Charity donation donating

TURTLE APPEAL - Help fly Olivia the loggerhead turtle from Guernsey to Gran Canaria

We really need your help to get Olivia back to warmer waters.

Olivia is now ready to be flown to the Canary islands and we are currently appealing for funds to help towards the costs of her flight.

With just over £2450 raised so far we are the fifth of the way towards being able to afford the costs of her flight.

To transport a loggerhead turtle from one country to another requires Cites documents which we are in the midst of awaiting completion from the Spanish authorities.

When we first rescued Olivia she was extremely weak, starving, dehydrated and close to death.

Just over two months later and she is now swimming and eating on her own which is difficult to achieve in captivity.

The next big step for Olivia is to get her back to a warmer climate and a rescue centre with experience to finish her rehabilitation.

We have arranged a place for Olivia in the Canary Islands and we need to raise the funds and arrange a plane to help transport her back to where she belongs.

Geoff George Ambulance Driver, Marine Medic and main carer for Olivia at the GSPCA said "Olivia is eating extremely well which is is a massive step in her rehabilitation as they are so difficult to feed in captivity."

"She is strong enough to travel but not only do we need to find the funding to transport her to the Canary Islands we are awaiting the relevant documents."

"She is doing very well at the GSPCA but we are appealing for funds so that when we receive the paperwork to transport her we can get it done quickly."

Steve Byrne GSPCA Manager said "Each day we move closer to be able to move Olivia to Gran Canaria and we are currently appealing for funds to help move her south."

"A huge thank you to everyone that has donated so far which has helped raise £2450 of at least £12500 we need to raise to cover the costs to fly her to a turtle rescue in the Canaries."

"Olivia was so weak, dehydrated and thin we were really worried for her when she first arrived, but thanks to the team at the GSPCA especially Geoff George, John Knight and the team at the Vetcare Centres, Les Van Blerk and the team at Vets 4 Pets, Spa De La Mare, Waitrose, Guernsey Reef, States Works, Guernsey Aquarium, Guernsey Builders and many others she has improved each day and is now ready for a long journey."

"Loggerhead turtles are listed as Endangered and facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild in the near future according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources."

"In the wild they face many threats with the greatest threat being a loss of nesting habitat due to coastal development, predation of nests and human disturbances such as coastal lighting and housing developments that cause disorientations during the emergence of hatchlings."

"Other major threats include incidental capture in longline fishing, shrimp trawling and pollution. as well as incidental capture in fisheries is thought to have played a significant role in the recent population declines observed for these wonderful creatures."

"World wide the population of loggerhead turtles is estimated to only be between 40,000 and 50,000 nesting females which is less than the population of Guernsey."

"We are now desperately looking to find a plane that could help and donations towards the travel to help with costs of fuel and landing taxes."

"New Era Vets from Jersey have helped start the fund with a donation of £280 which was left after transporting the loggerhead turtle called Terri they rescued earlier this year and we are hugely grateful to them and to others that have donated towards her care."

"We are aware that costs just for fuel and landing taxes from the Channel Islands to the Canary Isles are over £12,500 so this is a huge appeal to help one very special lady."

"So far we have raised just over £2450 and need to raise a further £10000 to get this rare and beautiful animal back to where she belongs which is the costs we have been told by one very kind plane owner, although we continue to search for other options."

"If you know of a plane that could help or would like to make a donation we would love to hear from you."

"Thank you to everyone that has helped so far it is really appreciated."

To make a donation online please click the paypal button below, call 01481 257261, by post or at the GSPCA. 

If you know of someone that could help with transport please call GSPCA Manager Steve Byrne 01481 257261 or email stevejbyrne@gspca.org.gg

To see previous updates for Olivia please click here

To donate via giving.gg to help Olivia the loggerhead turtle home please click here

giving.gg GSPCA Guernsey Charity donation donating

TURTLE APPEAL - Help fly Olivia the loggerhead turtle from Guernsey to Gran Canaria

Loggerhead facts

  • Common Name: Loggerhead - named for its exceptionally large head.
  • Scientific Name: Caretta caretta
  • Description: Head is very large with heavy strong jaws. Carapace is bony without ridges and has large, non-overlapping, rough scutes (scales) present with 5 lateral scute. Carapace is heart shaped. Front flippers are short and thick with 2 claws, while the rear flippers can have 2 or 3 claws. Carapace is a reddish-brown with a yellowish-brown plastron. Hatchlings have a dark-brown carapace with flippers pale brown on margins.
  • Size/Weight/Age: The Loggerhead measures up to 1.1 meters (3.5 ft) long when fully grown, weighing approximately 135 kilograms (300 lb) and have a lifespan of 47-67 years.
  • Diet: The Loggerhead Sea Turtle is omnivorous, feeding mainly on bottom dwelling invertebrates: mollusks, crustaceans, horseshoe crabs, clams, mussels, and other marine animals. Its large and powerful jaw serve as an effective tool in dismantling its prey.
  • Habitat: Prefer to feed in coastal bays and estuaries, as well as in the shallow water along the continental shelves of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans.
  • Reproduction: Female Loggerheads, between the age of 17 to 33, will usually mate every 2 to 4 years.
  • Crawl Pattern: 1) Alternating comma-shaped flipper marks 2) Wavy and smoothed track center with no thin, straight, and well-defined tail-drag mark 3) No regular marking from front flippers at the margins of the track
  • Nesting: Female Loggerheads are known to nest from one to seven times within a nesting season (mean is about 4.1 nests per season) at intervals of approximately 12–17 days. Mean clutch size varies from about 100 to 126 along the southeastern United States coast. Incubation ranges from about 45 to 95 days, depending on incubation temperatures, but averages 55 to 60 days for most clutches.
  • International Status - Listed as Endangered (facing high risk of extinction in the wild in the immediate future) by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources ( IUCN)
  • Threats to Survival: Fishing gear is the biggest threat to loggerheads in the open ocean. They often become entangled in longlines or gillnets. According to the 2009 status review of loggerheads by the Fisheries Service, drowning from entanglement in longline and gillnet fishing gear is the turtles’ primary threat in the North Pacific. The second greatest threat is loss of nesting habitat due to coastal development, predation of nests, and human disturbances (such as coastal lighting and housing developments) that discourages nesting and interferes with the hatchlings' ability to navigate to the water's edge

To see some of the businesses that have helped please check out the links below.

Waitrose Rohais - http://www.waitrose.com/bf_home/bf/333.html

For details of Waitrose Fish Friday please visit - http://www.waitrose.com/home/mywaitrose/fishfridays.html

Guernsey Builders - mario@guernseybuildingsupplies.com

Spa De La Mare - http://www.spadelamare.com/

Guernsey Aquarium - https://www.facebook.com/guernsey.aquarium/

To donate via giving.gg to help Olivia the loggerhead turtle home please click here

giving.gg GSPCA Guernsey Charity donation donating

TURTLE APPEAL - Help fly Olivia the loggerhead turtle from Guernsey to Gran Canaria

To donate to the turtle or Bonnie the grey seal pup please call 01481 257261, pop along to the Animal Shelter in St Andrews, by post or by clicking the link below.

To become an Angel Pen Pal sponsor please click here.

 

If you find a sick our injured wild animal please call 257261 or click here for advice.

Bonnie The Seal from karldorfner on Vimeo.

To see all of our events, links and fund raisers please click here

To donate towards the many animals in our care, you can do so by:

Calling: 01481 257261

By post or popping in the Shelter: GSPCA, Rue des Truchots, St Andrews, Guernsey, GY6 8UD

Or our Paypal page by clicking the link below

Our Just Giving Page by clicking here.

Or why not become an Angel Pen Pal Sponsor and give each month to help animals in our care by clicking here.

For your business to become a Corporate Angel Pen Pal sponsor please click here.

If you could help towards or new multi purpose building please click here to find out about the Build Partner programme.

If you are looking to adopt an animal and to complete an adoption form please click here. 

If you would like to fund raise or help the GSPCA please contact the GSPCA on 01481 257261 or email stevejbyrne@gspca.org.gg

To complete our local Guernsey microchip survey -

Create your own user feedback survey

To see all of our events, links and fund raisers please click here

Looking for pet insurance in Guernsey? Check out the GSPCA pet insurance with Rossborough http://www.rossboroughpetinsurance.co.uk

Posted by GSPCA on Tuesday, 30 June 2015

To find out about our Build Partner programme please click here

GSPCA Build Partner programme at the GSPCA Animal Shelter in Guernsey - could your business support the GSPCA and animals in Guernsey - CSR - Corporate Social Responsibility -

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Volunteering at the GSPCA Animal Shelter in Guernsey

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GSPCA Animal Shelter Guided tours in Guernsey

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There are many ways to support the work of the GSPCA and you can even donate online by clicking the paypal link below.

Donate with JustGiving and PayPal

By post cheques payable to 'GSPCA' - GSPCA, Rue des Truchots, St Andrews, Guernsey, GY6 8UD

Or by phone 01481 257261.

To find out more regarding our Angel Sponsorship Scheme please click here.

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To see a page full of items on our GSPCA Wish List please click here.

giving.gg GSPCA Guernsey Charity donation donating

To donate online to help the GSPCA please visit - https://giving.gg/donate/charity/2/Guernsey-Society-for-the-Prevention-of-Cruelty-to-Animals-(GSPCA)

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